ETHICAL GUIDELINES FOR TECHNOLOGY USE

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Working copy here: notes.occupy.net/p/ethical-tech-use

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ETHICAL GUIDELINES FOR TECHNOLOGY USE:

The same standards of ethical behavior that characterize all of our interactions apply when using computers and the Internet. The following ethical guidelines apply regardless of location:

Out of respect for the privacy of others, occupiers may not post any picture or video of any member of the community without his or her permission.

You are responsible for anything sent or posted from your account(s). Therefore, it is imperative that you not share your password(s) with others.

Occupiers may not impersonate others in electronic communication.

Any use of technology to misrepresent oneself, to disparage the school or any person within the community, or to depict or advocate illegal or inappropriate behavior is a violation of school rules.

Occupiers may not post images or videos of school events without the school’s permission. This includes photos of occupiers at school.

Occupiers may not use computers to harass, insult, attack, or demean others.

Occupiers may not use obscenities or foul language.

Occupiers may not send material that is inappropriate to other members of the school community.

Possible Consequences
Violation of these ethical guidelines will result in serious disciplinary measures, such as a detention, a conference with parents, or a suspension.

3 Responses to “ETHICAL GUIDELINES FOR TECHNOLOGY USE”

  1. Lippe

    Not so keen on this. It’s written from the perspective of “make it all illegal & selectively enforce” so common with institutions. (material that is inappropriate = srsly?)
    It does break down into a few key areas:
    1) Representation of self
    2) Representation of others (which could include personal/contact info)
    3) Aggressive or “invasive” behavior. (I see harassment as being possible without threat or aggression.)

  2. Dallas

    No posting of people’s pics w/o express permission? Remember: n a sense we really depend on visual documentation of the police and other law enforcement/security personnel to protect our 1st amendment rights on a real and near constant basis. I don’t think it’s sensible for us to restrict visual documentation of each other (provided we’re talking about content generated in a public space with a openly visible cam) and then tell cops and others that our basis for livestreaming them etc. without getting signed consent is their presence on public property in open view.

    It’s obviously the right thing to do to ask whether someone wants to be photographed or posted, but I don’t think making it a hard requirement is practical or fair to everyone.
    If you want to keep your face off the net, let’s get the stupid NYC mask law overturned!… but I digress.

    BTW, which school did these rules get C+P’d from? Seems like it might be a set of rules for minors, which makes more sense in terms of the high level of restriction on commonplace and legal activity.

  3. David "Lefty" Schlesinger

    “Out of respect for the privacy of others, occupiers may not post any picture or video of any member of the community without his or her permission.”

    Not only is this unenforceable, but it’s unreasonable — participants in a mass public gathering have no reasonable expectation of privacy. If you’re expecting, for example, news organizations to respect this, you’d seem to be infringing their rights under the First Amendment.

    “Violation of these ethical guidelines will result in serious disciplinary measures, such as a detention, a conference with parents, or a suspension.”

    なんだ?